Interventional radiologists treat uterine fibroids with flip of wrist

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March 27, 2014 - Interventional radiologists have devised a new way to access a woman’s fibroids—by flipping her wrist and treating via an arm not groin artery—to nonsurgically shrink noncancerous growths in the muscular wall of the uterus. Researchers found this to be less painful and traumatic for women, allowing them to immediately sit up and move after uterine fibroid embolization (UFE)—with no overnight stay, according to a March article in the Society of Interventional Radiology’s flagship publication, the Journal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology


Mount Sinai Medical Center researchers studied the access treatment favored by cardiologists for coronary interventions—and applied it to a minimally invasive treatment for women’s uterine fibroids. By flipping access for treatment from the artery in the groin to the artery in the wrist, the researchers said that the women experienced less pain and trauma than the traditional groin technique—opening the door to potential savings in health care costs. Complications related to bleeding at the puncture site are also significantly reduced using this novel approach. This approach could pave the way toward improving other interventional radiology treatments—including those for cancer patients. 

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March 27, 2014
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